Weather themed preschool lesson plans. Arts and crafts, games, math, science, group time activities, songs and snack ideas.

Weather ChartEach day for the month of April, chart the weather. Was it sunny, rainy, cold, or warm. Ask your child for as many descriptive words as they can think of about the day!!!

Discussion:
Talk about weather and the different kinds of weather. How does weather influence the world around us? What good is rain? What is the rain cycle? Discuss the different types of clouds.

Rain
  • The Umbrella
    • Umbrella (Picture Puffins)
    • Elsina's Clouds
    • Priscilla and the Splish-Splash Surprise
    • Rain Feet
    • Otto's Rainy Day
    • Bringing the Rain to Kapiti Plain: StoryTape (StoryTape, Puffin)
    • Raindrop, Plop!=
Kool Aid ArtSprinkle a little dry Kool aid mix onto a piece of paper. Have your child spray water from a spray bottle onto the paper. Use different colored Kool-aid mix. For added adventure, you may choose to take your children out into the rain with a piece of paper that has Kool-aid on it.

Umbrella Art
Cut out an umbrella shape and have your child decorate it with paint, glitter, fabric, crayons, or whatever you can come up with.
Thunderstorm:
When it is raining, watch the rain. Talk about the sounds that you hear during a rain storm. What are the signs that a storm is coming. Talk about storm safety!!!


Spray Art
Fill a spray bottle 3/4 full with water. Place a small amount of paint (powdered or liquid) into the water. If you use too much or do not shake well the paint will clog up the spray bottle. Do this for at least three different bottles, with three different colors. Then place a large piece of paper on the floor, on an easel, on a wall or fence outside. Then have the children spray the colored water on the paper. Allow to dry.
Raindrop Hats Make hats from newsprint and have the child decorate with blue paint or rain and rainbow stickers.
Raindrop People Give the children a piece of white paper, and a blue raindrop shape. Have the children glue the raindrop onto the paper, and then draw a body as if the raindrop was a head.

Torn Paper Raindrops
Draw a raindrop shape on a piece of paper. Have the children tear pieces of blue construction paper, and glue them inside the lines for the raindrop shape.

Raindrop Necklaces 
Supply the children with raindrop shaped stencil. Have the children cut out raindrop shapes from construction paper. Then, have the child use a hole punch to make a hole, so they can thread them onto a piece of yarn.
Raindrop Rubbing Cut raindrop shapes from paper doilies or sandpaper. Tape these raindrops to the table. Have the children place a piece of thin white paper over the raindrops and rub a crayon over the raindrop.

Raindrop Art
Supply the children with raindrop shaped sponges and paint and have them make a rain scene with them.

Raindrop Cookie Cutter Art:
Obtain a cookie cutter that is shaped like a raindrop. Have the children dip the cookie cutter in a shallow container of blue paint, then press onto a piece of paper to make raindrop prints.

Sticker Art
Supply the children with raindrop shaped stickers and have them place them on a piece of white paper.

Stamp Art
Supply the children with raindrop stamps and have them make a rain scene with the stamps.

Raindrop Headbands
Measure your child's head, and cut a piece of construction paper long enough to create a headband. Glue the paper together so the headband fits snugly on your child's head but is loose enough to take off easily. Have the children cut out blue raindrop shapes or use stickers and glue to the headband.

Fingerprint Raindrops
Supply your children with white paper and a non-toxic blue stamp pad. Have the children make fingerprints on the paper to represent raindrops.

Measuring rainfall
On a rainy day, set out a container to measure the rainfall. Measure how much rain fell that day. Continue to measure the rain each day, and record for a few weeks. Ask your child to predict how much water will be collected. Ask at the beginning of the day and ask when it is raining. Did their answer change?

Bean Bag Puddle Toss
You need a hula hoop (the puddle) and some bean bags. You can either set up the hula hoop on its side or on the ground. Have your child try to throw the bean bags into the puddle.

Jump in the Puddle
Set a hula hoop on the floor. Play some music and have your child walk around the hula hoop. When the music stops, have them jump into the hoop (the puddle).

Jump Over the Puddle
Cut out puddle shapes from blue paper or newspaper (you can have the children paint it blue). They need to be small enough for the children to be able to hop over. Then set them on the floor and ask the children to take turns hopping over the puddle.

Wet or Dry
Cut some pictures from a magazine, or show some pictures from a book, ask your child if the objects are wet or dry?

Raindrop fishing
Cut out several raindrop shapes from light blue construction paper. Write several numbers or letters on them. Have them laminated. Then place a paper clip on each raindrop. Make a fishing pole out of a dowel or pencil, string and a magnet. Place the raindrops on the floor and have the children sit in chairs around the raindrops. (This may work better with a few fishing poles.) Have the children try to catch a raindrop with the fishing pole. Then, when they catch one, show it to them and ask what letter or number it is.Variation: For younger children you could make the raindrops different colors and ask what color is the raindropVariation: Ask the child if they can catch the "a" or the "1"

Raindrop Search 
Cut out many raindrop shapes and hide them around the room. Have the children search for them like an Easter egg hunt.

Raindrop Hop
Place raindrop shapes on the floor. Have the children hop from one raindrop to the next.

Raindrop Seat Markers
Cut out and laminate big raindrop shapes to be used as seat markers for the children to sit on during story and circle time.

Rain, Rain
Rain, rain, go awayCome again some other dayWe want to go outside and playCome again some other day(Optional lyrics: change third line to say:(child's name)'s friends all want to play

It's raining, it's pouring,
It's raining, it's pouring,The old man is snoring.He went to bed and heBumped his headAnd he couldn't get up in the morning.

It Ain't Gonna Rain 
It ain't gonna rain no more, no moreIt ain't gonna rain no more,How in the heck will we wash the neckIf it ain't gonna rain no more?

If All the Raindrops 
If all the raindrops were lemon drops and gumdropsOh, what a rain that would be!Standing outside, with my mouth open wideSinging La la la la, la la la, la la la, If all the raindrops were lemon drops and gumdropsOh, what a rain that would be!
If all the snowflakes were candy bars and milkshakesOh, what a snow that would be!Standing outside, with my mouth open wideSinging La la la la, la la la, la la la, If all the snowflakes were candy bars and milkshakesOh, what a snow that would be!
If all the sunbeams were bubble gum and ice creamOh, what a sun that would be!Standing outside, with my mouth open wideSinging La la la la, la la la, la la la, If all the sunbeams were bubble gum and ice creamOh, what a sun that would be!
Musical Raindrops
Cut out large raindrop shapes from colored paper. Laminate them and cut them out. Place them on the floor. It is best for younger children to have more raindrops than children. Play music and have the children walk around the room. When the music stops each child needs to find a raindrop to stand on.

What time is it Mr. Raindrop?
This is a fun game to play outside. You can change the name to suit any theme. The children all line up against a wall or fence. And one child, Mr. Raindrop or the teacher faces away from the children, a good distance away from the children. The children yell, what time is it "Mr. Raindrop", Mr. Raindrop answers 1 o'clock, and the children all take one step toward Mr. Raindrop. The children yell again, what time is it "Mr. Raindrop", Mr. Raindrop answers (fill in the blank) o'clock, and the children all take same number of step toward Mr. Raindrop. This continues until all the children are very close to Mr. Raindrop, then Mr. Raindrop will answer it's midnight, and chases the children back to the fence or wall that they started at. The first person Mr. Raindrop touches will be the new Mr. Raindrop.

Raindrop Feelie Center
Cut raindrop shapes from blue fabrics with different textures. Glue these onto a piece of cardboard. When dry, let the children feel the different textures.

Rain Plates
Sprinkle a bit of tempera paint or a few drops of food coloring onto a paper plate. Have the child take the plate out into the rain for a few seconds, then bring the plate back inside and allow to dry. If you don't want to brave the rain, just have the children use a spray bottle to add water to their plate.
Evaporation:
Obtain two clear plastic glasses of the same size. Measure one cup of water and place in each cup. Mark the water level of each cup with a permanent marker. Place one in a sunny window and the other somewhere else in the room. Observe the glasses of water over the nest couple of days. Ask the children where the water is going. Which is evaporating more quickly? Evaporation occurs when the particles of water become warm enough that they turn into vapors and leave the cup and escape into the air. Why did the water in the sun evaporate faster?


Rain Spattered Umbrellas
You will need: watered down non-toxic blue paint, paper, pipettes and straws. Supply each child with a straw and a piece of paper. Allow the children to use the pipette (or medicine dropper NOT GLASS) to place a small amount of paint onto a piece of paper. Then, have them use the straw to blow the paint around their picture.

Rain Sticks
Seal off one end of a paper towel tube with tape or tape heavy construction paper or tag board over one hole. Pre-poke holes in the side of the paper towel tube with either a small nail or an awl. The child then can insert toothpicks into the holes. Have the child fill with dried rice or lentils, then seal the other end of the tube. Cover the tube with construction paper, then have the child decorate as desired. To use the rain stick, simply turn it over and listen to the rain.

Prop Box Rain Ideas
Raincoats, rain hats, rain boots, child sized umbrella.

Rain in a Bag
Place a handful of dirt, some grass and a couple of tablespoons of water in a ziplock sandwich bag. Place a straw in the bag with out end still sticking out. Seal the bag around the straw then blow air into the bag through the straw until it is filled. Seal the bag closed. Set the bag in the window on a sunny day and see it rain inside the bag.

Cloud Blots and Raindrops
Fold a piece of light blue construction paper in half. Have the children add a couple of drops of white or gray paint to the paper. Have the child refold the paper and press the two halved together. Have the child roll a rolling pin over the paper, in every direction. Then unfold and let dry. Then, fill a spray bottle 3/4 full with water. Place a small amount of blue paint (powdered or liquid) into the water. If you use too much or do not shake well the paint will clog up the spray bottle. Have the children spray the colored water on the paper. Allow to dry.
Paper Plate Umbrellas
Have the children decorate large paper plates with paint, crayons, markers or whatever they would like. When finished and dry, poke a hole in the middle large enough for the child to stick their finger through. Use the umbrellas at circle time, have the children sings a song about the rain while holding the umbrellas over their head.
What Happens to the Rain
After it rains, take the children out to follow the path of the rain. Where does it go? Does it seep into the ground, down the sewer? What happens to the rain on the sidewalk or on the slide? 

Songs from http://www.kididdles.com
Cloud Pictures
Clouds
Fairies of the Rain
Have You Heard the Wind?
If All the Little Raindrops
It Ain't Gonna Rain
It's Raining, It's Pouring
Little Raindrops
Louder Than Thunder
Pretty Rainbow
Rain
Rain, Rain, Go Away
Rain, The
Rainbow, The
Rainbow Song
Rainbow Song by Suzy Gazlay
Raindrop Soldiers
Splash! Fall the Raindrops
Spring
Summer Rain
Weather, The
Clouds
Cotton Ball Clouds
Make gray cloud shapes from construction paper. Have the children glue on cotton balls.
Watch the Clouds
On a partly cloudy day take the children out to watch the clouds. Talk about the shapes of the clouds. How do they move? What happens when they cover the sun? What colors of clouds are there? 

Paint with Clouds Supply each child with a piece of blue paper, a cotton ball and white paint. Have the child dip the cotton ball into the white paint and press onto the paper to make cloud prints.

Paint with a Cloud 2
Supply the children with a piece of white paper an many cotton balls and many different colors of paint, and have them paint with the cotton ball on the paper.
Playing with Clouds Put some shaving cream on the table. Tell the children to imagine that it is a cloud. To keep children to their own personal space use a paper plate for the shaving cream.
Blue Shaving Cream Art 
Add a few drops of blue paint to shaving cream. Have the children use this to paint with. Not mixing the paint in will give it a special look.
3-D Clouds
Cut out two identical cloud shapes from construction paper. Let the children paint these shapes with gray paint. For added texture, mis the paint with a bit of shaving cream. Allow to dry. Staple the shapes together, but leave about five inches unstapled. Have the children stuff with newspaper then finish stapling around the edge. Staple a piece of yarn to hang the projects from the ceiling. 

Wind
Kite Art
Supply the children with paper, glue and ribbon. Have the children cut and glue pieces of paper together and add ribbon to make a kite. This kite can be a very open ended art project, by not requiring the kite to be a specific shape, the children are free to make the kite however they wish. Have the children add a ribbon tail and hang the kites from the ceiling.

Would the Wind Blow It?
Set up a fan in your room to test if a variety of items could be blown by the wind. Before you try each item, have the children predict if the item will move in the wind. Try feathers, paper, paper balled up, blocks, plastic cars, dolls, leaves, plastic bags, and other items in your room.
Wind art:
Click here to see an example
You will need: watered down non-toxic paint, paper, pipettes and straws. Supply each child with a straw and a piece of paper. Allow the children to use the pipette (or medicine dropper NOT GLASS) to place a small amount of paint onto a piece of paper. Then, have them use the straw to blow the paint around their picture.

Wind Sock
Cut the bottom off a brown paper bag. Decorate and add streamers to the bottom. Hang from the ceiling or have the children try the wind sock outside or in front of a fan.

Bubbles in the Wind
On a windy day, blow bubbles. Ask the children why the bubbles are moving around so quickly. You can even have the wind blow the bubbles for you. Ask the children what is making the bubbles.

Sun
Sun Prints
On a sunny day, have the children place various objects on a piece of fading construction paper. Leave it out for the day and come back to see what happened.

Sun Art
Have children paint a paper plate yellow. When dry, the children can add facial features with a marker. You may even glue yellow strips of paper around the edges for rays.

Sun Masks
Have children paint a paper plate yellow. Then cut out holes for eyes, and glue a Popsicle stick on the back of the plate.

Mister Sun
Oh mister sun, sun, mister golden sun, (Place hands over head to form sun) Please shine down on me. (Wiggle fingers while moving hands down) Oh mister sun, sun, mister golden sun,(Place hands over head to form sun) Hiding behind the tree. (Place hands over eyes) These little children are asking you, (Points to children) To please come out so we can play with you. (I don't know sign) Oh mister sun, sun, mister golden sun,(Place hands over head to form sun) Please shine down on,(Wiggle fingers while moving hands down) Won't you shine down on,(Wiggle fingers while moving hands down) Please shine down on me.(Point at self)

Torn Paper Sunshines
Have the children tear pieces of yellow construction paper, and glue them on a paper plate for a sun!.

Sunshine Necklaces 
Supply the children with many yellow circles. (You can buy them here!!) Then, have them use a hole punch to make a hole, so they can thread them onto a piece of yarn.

Sunshine Rubbings 
Cut circle shapes from paper doilys or sandpaper. Tape these sunshines to the table. Have the children place a piece of thin white paper over the circles and rub a yellow crayon over the circle (sunshine).

Jump into the Sunshine
Set a hula hoop on the floor. Play some music and have your child walk around the hula hoop. When the music stops, have them jump into the hoop (the sunshine).

Jump Over the Sun
Cut out circle from yellow paper or newspaper (you can have the children paint it yellow). They need to be small enough for the children to be able to hop over. Then set them on the floor and ask the children to take turns hopping over the sun.

Sun Fishing
Cut out several sun shapes from light yellow construction paper. Write several numbers or letters on them. Have them laminated. Then place a paper clip on each sun. Make a fishing pole out of a dowel or pencil, string and a magnet. Place the suns on the floor and have the children sit in chairs around the suns. (This may work better with a few fishing poles.) Have the children try to catch a sun with the fishing pole. Then, when they catch one.. show it to them and ask what letter or number it is. Variation: For younger children you could make the suns different colors and ask what color is the sun Variation: Ask the child if they can catch the "a" or the "1"

Sunshine Headbands
Measure your child's head, and cut a piece of construction paper long enough to create a headband. Glue the paper together so the headband fits snugly on your child's head but is loose enough to take off easily. Have the children cut out yellow sun shapes or use stickers and glue to the headband.

Sunshine Musical Chairs
If they children made sunshine headbands, have them wear them during this activity. Arrange the chairs in a circle. If you have younger children it is best to have too many chairs. This can be a game where everyone wins. Place different color circles on each chair. Have the children walk around the chairs until the music stops. Then everyone finds a chair. Ask who is sitting on a chair with a red circle? Yellow? Etc.

Sun Bean Bag Toss
Cut out three sun shapes from a piece of cardboard. Paint around the shapes with yellow. When dry, prop up the cardboard and have the children play bean bag toss, trying to get the bean bags in the sun shaped holes.

Paper Plate Sun Shaker 
Take two sturdy paper plates. (The stronger the better) Place some shape seeds on one of the plates and place the other plate on top of the first so that both eating surface areas are facing each other. Use masking tape to seal the plates together. Have your child decorate with yellow markers, glitter, construction paper, or ribbons. When dry, shake. Shake to music, shake it each time you take a step. Shake, Shake Shake!!!
 
What is a year: 
Discuss with the children what a year is. Have one child stand in one place. They will be the sun. You can even give them a yellow plate with the word sun on it. Ask another child to be the earth. They can have a blue or green plate. Make the floor with masking tape where the child will start and stop. Have the earth child walk around the sun while spinning. Have them stop on the masking tape. Tell the children it takes 365 days for the earth to go all the way around the sun. Let other children have a chance to be the sun and earth. You can explain a day by having the sun child hold a flashlight. Turn out the lights, and have the earth child turn around in the same spot.

Snow
Art

Cotton Snowmen
Let your child use cotton balls to glue on blue paper to create a snowman!! If your child is older that three, you can glue beads on for the eyes, nose, mouth and buttons!

Paper Snowflakes 
Help your child make paper snowflakes. Hang them from the ceiling, and from the tree. Last year I got butcher paper, and I made 3 foot snowflakes, with my son, for my front window, and my parents. They loved them.

Fingerprint Snowmen 
Show the children how to make fingerprints on a piece of paper. Then, have them try to make a few snow men. With a big fingerprint on the bottom, medium in the middle and small on the top. Have the children add features with a pencil.

Torn Paper Snow Pictures 
Supply the children with a full sheet of blue paper and half sheet of white paper. Ask them to make a winter scene by tearing pieces of the white paper and gluing them onto the blue paper. Small amounts of other colored paper may be used.

Winter Clothes 
Supply the children with stencils of winter clothes and boy and girl shapes, and lots of different papers, or wall paper. Have the children trace the stencils and cut them out. Have them glue the winter clothes onto the boy/girl shape.

Snow Salt Art 
Saturate hot water with salt. Let the water cool, and have the child use the salt water to paint on black paper. Then after it dries, have the child look at the crystals of salt on the paper.

Pine tree Art 
Provide a child with a pine tree branch, paint and a piece of paper and have the child dip the pine tree branch in the paint and use as a paintbrush.

Tin Foil Art
Supply the children with blue paint, paintbrushes and tin foil to create a picture on a different texture.

Paper Plate Snowman
Each child will need a paper plate, a Popsicle stick, scrap paper, glue and scissors. Have the child cut out scrap pieces of paper to create a mouth and nose, glue pieces onto the plate. Cut out two circles for the eyes, and add a Popsicle stick to create a mask.

Snowflake Rubbing
Create different snowflake shapes with either tag board or cardboard. Place the shapes under a piece of white paper and have the child rub over the shape with a blue or purple crayon.

Shaving Cream Snowman
This project was made my mixing shaving cream with glue. A Popsicle stick was used to spread the mixture onto the paper. Scraps of paper can be used for eyes, nose, mouth, hat, buttons and arms. In the images, white paper was used. I would suggest a different color such as blue, or mixing blue paint or food coloring into the shaving cream mix.

Snowman Banner
Make a snowman template with butcher paper. (See picture) Have the children glue cotton balls onto the snowman. Add felt features such as a hat, nose, eyes, scarf.. etc.

Snowman Treasures Collage
Based on the book "Snowballs". Have the children create a snowman from art scraps.

Snowman Templates
Provide the children with a template sheet. Have the children cut out shapes to match the template. Then have the children glue the shapes onto a piece of paper.

Coconut Snowman
Place glue on a piece of paper in the shape of a snowman. Have the children add coconut to the paper. Then use raisins for the eyes and buttons.

Marshmallow Snowman Scene
Have the children make a snow scene with white paint. They can use marshmallows to paint with, smaller ones for the snowflakes and larger ones to make a snowman.

Painting with snowballs, Cotton Ball Art
Let the children use cotton balls as paintbrushes to create a winter scene.

Sponge Printing
Provide the children with winter shaped sponges. Have the children press the sponge into some paint and press onto a piece of paper. For more detailed art, paint the sponge with a paintbrush, then press onto the paper.

Snowman Foot
Paint a child's foot white. Press the foot onto a piece of blue paper. When dry add eyes, nose and mouth to the head (heel of the foot) and other features.

Snow Globe
Have the children create a snow globe scene. You can precut the shapes for them to glue, or have them cut or tear them themselves.

Shower Scrub Snowman
This pictures was created by using a shower scrub as a paint brush. Children dip the scrub into the paint and dab onto the paper. children can create a snowman or snow scene. After the paint dries add features to your picture with construction paper or crayons.

Parent Pleaser Snowman
Cut out snowmen shapes and hats from art foam. Have the children glue the hat and draw buttons on the snowman. Insert a picture of the child as a face and attach a magnet onto the back.

Toilet Paper Tube Snowman
Cut out snowmen shapes From white paper. Have the children decorate the shape, then affix to a toilet paper tube. Use a plastic egg carton section for a hat.

Paper Plate Snowman
Provide the children with a large and small paper plate and art scraps to create a snowman.

Mittens 
Most advanced:
They may draw their own mitten shape onto a piece of paper and cut it out on their own. Then have them decorate it with markers, crayons, paint, sequins, glitter, ribbons, bows, lace... whatever you can come up with.
Moderate:
You draw the mitten shape onto a piece of paper and the children cut it out on their own. Then have them decorate it.
Simple:
You draw the mitten shape onto a piece of paper and the cut it out for them. Then have them decorate it.

Hands Pyramid
Paint the child's hand white, and place three hand prints on the bottom of the page. Paint the other hand blue and place one hand print at the top. Then have the child mix the paint on their hands and make two light blue hand prints in the middle. (In the demo, red and white were used)

Contact Paper Art
You will need a picture of a snowflake other winter image. A reverse image is needed if the letter or picture can be backwards, such as the letter "E". Place the image on the table and place a piece of contact paper, sticky side up over the image. Supply the children with scraps of construction paper to tissue paper. (Pieces of a plastic lei were used for the photo of this project) Children use the scraps to create the image on the contact paper.

Games/Math/Science

Counting Snowballs
Use an empty egg carton for this activity. Supply the children with white pom poms. Write numbers in the bottom of the egg carton sections. Have the children place the appropriate number of pom poms in each section.

Snowman Counting
Make snowmen shapes on index cards. Write numbers on the hat of each snowman. Provide the children with colored pom-pom. The children look at the number on the hat and place the appropriate number of pom poms on the snowman.

Snowman Number Matching
Make snowmen shapes on index cards. Write numbers on the bellies of one set and matching buttons on another set. I.e. 1 card with the number "1", and a matching card with one button. Mix the cards up, and have the children find the matches.

Snowman Color Matching
Make snowmen shapes on index cards. Create different colored hats in pairs. Have the children match the snowmen based on the color of their hat.

Snowman Sorting
Make snowmen shapes on index cards. Make each snowman a little different. Have some with black hats, some with red, some with three buttons, some with two, some with scarves, some without. Then have the children sort the snowmen. Ask the child how they sorted the snowmen.

Snowman Bowling
Attach a snowman image to a bowling pin, or a pop bottle with a little bit of sand in the bottom. Set up the pins and have the children try to knock them over with a ball.

Connect Four
You can place snowflake stickers on the pieces of a "Connect Four" game. Play the game according to the traditional rules.

Sequencing Snowballs
Provide the children with three different sized foam ball for the children to sequence. If you have multiple sets you could also have the children sort the balls by size.

Play Doh Fun
Winter shaped cookie cutters and play-doh can provide a sensory experience. The children could also roll white play-doh into three different sized balls to create a snowman.

Snowball Toss
Have the children toss foam ball into a basket for a fun gross motor game.

Parachute Snowballs
Add foam balls to your parachute activity. Have the children try to get the snowballs off the parachute or keep them on.

Blue Cling Wrap
Place blue cling wrap on a window so the children can look outside through it. You could also make toilet paper binoculars with blue cling wrap on the ends.

Snowflake Match
Create snowflakes using different shapes as the base of the snowflake, like a triangle, square etc. Make one big and one little of each shape. Have the children pick a snowflake, then find the matching snowflake shape.

Build in the Snow 
I hope if you have snow, you know how to do this one!!! LOL Three years ago we built this elephant. Damian loved to climb on top of it.

Inside skate
Have your child "skate" around inside. All you need is socks, and a floor that is not carpeted. Have fun!!!! It was also suggested to me that you can tie coloring books to your child's feet and "skate" on carpeting!

Footprint fun 
On a day that the snow has just fallen, ask the children to describe the snow on the ground. The children should see that there snow is smooth, and there aren't any footprints in the snow. Have the children walk across the snow, and have them turn around and look at their footprints. Have them follow their footprints back.

Picture Matching 
Find snow stickers. Place 2 identical stickers on the left and right sides of an index card. Cut the index in half, cut in a jig-jag form. Use a highlighter to highlight the edges. Do this with many different stickers. Have the child match the stickers, and line up the two halves of the index card.

Hot or Cold Weather 
Cut out many articles from magazines that represent hot, or cold weather. Ask your child to tell you which pictures are hot weather, and which are cold weather.

Summer or Winter Clothes 
Gather an assortment of clothes for summer and winter seasons. Show your child each piece of clothes, and ask your child if the clothing is winter or summer clothing.

Winter Activities 
Ask your child what activities can be done in the summer, but not the winter. And vice versa.

Lacing Cards 
Cut colored poster board into a winter shape (snowflake, snowman, mitten, hat) and punch holes around the edges. Them let your child lace yarn or a shoestring into the cards.

Stamping Patterns 
Use Winter Theme rubber stamps to create a simple pattern on the top half of a piece of paper. Ask your child to help you recreate the pattern on the bottom half of the paper. Tip: Start with one stamp, and have your child pick which stamp you used. Start slowly and work your way up to more complicated patterns.

Winter Shape Match Up 
There are many ways to set this up depending on the skill level or the particular skill you wish to work on. Try these different set ups: (Use your own Winter Shapes... mitten, hat, snowflake, etc)
---Cut out Winter Shapes from different colors of paper. Give each child one Winter Shape. Ask the children to find one person with the same color Winter Shape.
---Cut out Winter Shapes from different colors of paper. Cut the Winter Shapes in half using a puzzle type cut, like zig zag or interlocking pieces. Give each child one half of a Winter Shape, and ask them to find the person with the other half.
Or Give the children two pieces and have the children make a circle, with one child that has one match on one side and the other match on the other side. You may end up with 2 or more circles depending on how the Winter Shape pieces are distributed.
---Cut out Winter Shapes from one color of paper. Cut the Winter Shapes in half using a puzzle type cut, like zig zag or interlocking pieces. Give each child one half of a Winter Shape, and ask them to find the person with the other half.
Or Give the children two pieces and have the children make a circle, with one child that has one match on one side and the other match on the other side. You may end up with 2 or more circles depending on how the Winter Shape pieces are distributed.
---Cut the Winter Shapes from one color of paper. Label one set of Winter Shapes with numbers, i.e. if you have 20 children, label the Winter Shapes with the numbers one to ten. The other half, draw one dot on one, two on another, and so on until ten. Give each child one Winter Shape and have them find the child with their match.
---Cut the Winter Shapes from one color of paper. Place matching stickers on two Winter Shapes. Give each child one Winter Shape and have them find the child with their match.
---Cut the Winter Shapes from one color of paper. Cut the Winter Shapes in half using a puzzle type cut, like zig zag or interlocking pieces. Place matching stickers on each half of a Winter Shape. Give each child one Winter Shape half and have them find the child with their match.
---Place matching Winter stickers on separate index cards. Give each child a card and ask them to find the child with their match.
---Try all the above, but in a file folder format. Glue one part of the Winter Shape to the file folder and laminate it's match.

Winter Shape Hop 
Cut out large Winter shapes from colored paper. Laminate them and cut them out. Place them on the floor and ask the children to hop from one Shape to another. These may also be used at seat markers for group time.

Mitten Hide and Seek 
Have all the children hide their eyes while you "hide" a mitten in the room. (It should be placed in plain view) Tell the children to find the mitten, but not touch it. Once they spot it they should sit back down in their spot. The first one to sit down again will get to hide the mitten.

Mitten Hide and Seek 
Play the game the same as above, except hide the mitten. Then tell the children individually whether they are "hot" or "cold" to the relation of the mitten. Allow the other children to have a change to hide the mitten, and tell children whether they are "hot or cold". It may be a good idea to discuss the meaning of hot and cold before you play this game.

Winter Shape Fishing Game 
Tie 3 feet of string to a wooden spoon. Attach a magnet to the end of the string. Cut and laminate many different colored, and Winter Shapes from construction paper (not too big though). Attach a paper clip to each Winter Shape. Spread the Winter Shapes on the floor and let your child try to catch the Winter Shape. Have them try to catch the star or the biggest tree. For a twist, label the Winter Shapes with letters or numbers.

Winter Shaped Games 
The following games require you to cut out many different winters Shapes from construction paper. You may choose to laminate these Winter Shapes so they last longer.

Mitten Sizing 
Cut out many different sized Mittens. Ask the children to line up the mittens from largest to smallest.

Hat Sizing: 
Cut out many different sized hats. Ask the children to line up the hats from largest to smallest.

Snowflake Sizing: 
Cut out many different sized snowflakes. Ask the children to line up the snowflakes from largest to smallest.

Hat, Mitten, Snowflake Numbers 
Cut out ten shapes. Number them one to ten. Ask the children to line up the shapes from one to ten.

Winter Shape Colors 
Ask the children to sort the shapes by color.

Hat and Mitten Sort: 
Supply the children with plenty of hat and mitten shapes of many sizes and colors. Ask the children to sort the shapes by size, color or type.

Build a Snowman 
Supply the children with three white felt circles of different sizes, and other pieces for the features.. like an orange triangle for the nose, black circles for the eyes and buttons, a hat. Invite the children to make a snowman out of the pieces.

Sensory Snow: 
-Place some snow in your sand and water table for the children to experience.
-Supply the children with some snow and a balance or scale
-Look at a snowflake under a microscope
-Make snow cones (not with real snow)
-Watch snow melt
-Time how long it takes one tablespoon of snow to melt, compare that to the time it will take one cup of snow to melt.

What Time is it Jack Frost? 
Played like "What time is it Mr. Fox?"

Pretend to be a snowflake 
Ask the children to pretend to be a graceful snowflake falling from the sky. You could even play soothing music for them to dance to.

Sledding 
Provide the children with a sled and pull them around on it. Can you say "exercise"? LOL

Snowman, Snowman, Where's Your Nose?
Played like "Doggie Doggie, Where's Your Bone?"
Children sit in a circle. The teacher chooses one child to be the snowman, that child sits in the middle of the circle and hides their eyes. Then the teacher gives a toy to one child. The child hides the toy behind their back, while the other children pretend to have the toy, by holding their hands behind their backs. The children then chant:
Snowman, Snowman, Where's Your Nose?
Somebody took it from your home

Upstairs, Downstairs, by the telephone
Wake up Snowman, Find your Nose.
The child in the middle now can uncover their eyes. The child guesses which child they think had the toy (nose) by pointing at the child. The child shows his/her hands. The child in the middle gets up to three guesses. Regardless of whether the child in the middle was successful, the child who was hiding the toy, now sits in the middle.

Melting 
Have the children pretend they are a snowman that is melting.

Songs

Sing "Frosty the Snowman"

If All the Raindrops 
If all the raindrops were lemon drops and gumdrops
Oh, what a rain that would be!
Standing outside, with my mouth open wide
Singing La la la la, la la la, la la la,
If all the raindrops were lemon drops and gumdrops
Oh, what a rain that would be!

If all the snowflakes were candy bars and milkshakes
Oh, what a snow that would be!
Standing outside, with my mouth open wide
Singing La la la la, la la la, la la la,
If all the snowflakes were candy bars and milkshakes
Oh, what a snow that would be!


If all the sunbeams were bubble gum and ice cream
Oh, what a sun that would be!
Standing outside, with my mouth open wide
Singing La la la la, la la la, la la la,
If all the sunbeams were bubble gum and ice cream
Oh, what a sun that would be!

Snacks

Snowman Cupcake
Make your favorite cupcakes. After they cool add white frosting. Place two marshmallows onto a toothpick and insert into the center of the cupcake. Gel frosting can be used on the marshmallows for eyes and a nose. (Raisins were used in this example).

Biscuit Snowman
Use a pre-made biscuit mix or use your favorite recipe. Connect three together , affix raisins for the eyes, mouth and buttons, pretzels for the arms and bake. When cool use orange frosting gel for the nose.

Snowman CookiesSnowman Cookies
Use your favorite sugar cookie recipe to make these cookies. When cool let the children decorate with frosting and confections.

Snowman Marshmallows
Connect three marshmallows with a pretzel. Add pretzels for arms and use gel frosting for features.

Powdered Dough nut Holes

Pretend the dough nut holes are snowballs.

Cracker Cream Cheese Snowmen
Use two round crackers and cream cheese to create a snowman shape. Add facial features with frosting gel.